Deciding on residential aged care facilities for a loved one with dementia

How to best decide which dementia aged care facility is right for you

Deciding on residential aged care facilities for a loved one with dementia

Find out and caring for a loved one with dementia is tough enough, and the decision to move them into a residential aged care facility can be even tougher. Being prepared and knowing about the services, government policies and cost of residential care beforehand can make the decision less stressful.

What are the types of residential care facilities available?

1. Low-level care residential facilities

These facilities are suitable for those who are mobile but need some assistance with personal care, laundry, cooking, shopping or the supervision of their medications.

2. High-level care residential facilities

These facilities are more suitable for a loved one who are in later stages of dementia or have other medical conditions as they provide 24-hour nursing care for its residents and is staffed by nurses, assistants or personal care assistance.

3. Dementia-specific units

These units are reserved specifically for those who have dementia that may not be safely accommodated in general residential aged care facilities.

What is the first step?

Talk to:

  • A doctor for a formal dementia diagnosis. This kickstarts the process of finding a solution that meets the needs of the person with dementia.
  • Dementia Australia for information, advice, support and available research.
  • Other families and carers for emotional support and firsthand advice of transitioning your loved one into an aged care facility.
  • The Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT) to determine the type of care and subsidies your loved one with dementia is eligible for.
  • The Commonwealth Carers Resource Centre for information and advice carers about relevant services and entitlements.

How do I get the formal process started?

Contact My Aged Care to organise a consult with the Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT). ACAT will assess the eligibility and needs of your loved one with dementia for residential aged care. They will then recommend appropriate types of residential care and provide details of facilities which may be suitable.

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